GOVAN SILK WORKS1900

The Govan Silk Works (right of picture) Circa 1900.

This six-storey Mill was built at the western end of Govan in 1824 for Morris Pollok, where Fairfields Extension would be placed. Bales of silk were delivered to the works where the silk was processed, it was wound and "thrown" (spun) to produce silk thread.

In 1839 the mill employed about 300 workers (both adults and children) who all worked a 10-hour day. The Mill was heated and ventilated by steam and considered the most modern of its day.

A fire caused very serious damage to the works in 1873 and the damaged section was so bad it  was never rebuilt. The remainder of the building was demolished in 1901 to make way for an extension to the Fairfield Shipyard.

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GOVAN IRONWORKS 1840s

William Simpson's view, drawn in the late 1840s, showing William Dixon's Govan Ironworks at Hutchesontown from the south. The row of single-storey houses in front of the ironworks was known as "Collier's Raw".

The ironworks were founded by William Dixon (1788-1859), the son of the owner of the Little Govan Colliery. William extended his father's collieries in Govanhill but also, in 1839, founded an ironworks with five blast furnaces.

The furnaces lit up the night sky on the south side of the River Clyde, and earned the ironworks the nickname "Dixon's Blazes"

GOVAN COMBINATION HOSPITAL 1901

A view of the the Govan's Combination Hospital in Shieldhall, 1907.

The 120 bed hospital was built by the burghs of Govan and Kinning Park in combination in 1901 and consisted of seven pavilions where patients with infectious diseases such as scarlet fever, typhus and smallpox could be isolated and treated.

Glasgow Corporation assumed responsibility for its management and upkeep after the city annexed the Burgh of Govan in 1912.

GOVAN WEAVERS SOCIETY OCTOBER 1756
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