THOMAS FAIRBAIRN's VIEW OF GOVAN FROM THE NORTH-EAST Circa 1849
GOVAN VEHICLE FERRY AT WATER ROW Circa 1914
OLD GOVAN

This beautiful landscape shows the inn and other buildings at Pointhouse on the north bank of the river, looking west. The small rowing boat that provided a passenger service between Pointhouse and Water Row in Govan can be seen close to the bank.

THE GOVAN FERRY

The Govan Ferry and Harland & Wolff's workshops at Water Row  Govan, looking south-west, post-1914.  The company's workshops on Water Row were designed by Sir William Arrol & Co and built 1914-1915 using steel columns and roof trusses and with terracotta brick-faced walls. On the left is the Vehicle Ferry. The Vehicle and Passenger ferry that crossed between Govan and Pointhouse at the Ferry Dock Water Row.

GLASGOW UNDERGROUND
GLASGOW UNDERGROUND MAP

In 1890 the Glasgow District Subway Company was successful in it's application to build & operate a small (6 and a 1/2 miles) circular underground railway around the West, Central, & Southern areas within, & bordering, the City of Glasgow. 

It was opened in 1896 and it ran a fleet of cable hauled, diminutive, trains, that were propelled by a large winding engine in Scotland Street. It served 15 stations dotted in a rough circle around the city.

GOVAN CINEMAS
THE LYCEUM CINEMA GOVAN

Govan had the choice of four main venues; the Elder, Lyceum, Plaza and Vogue. There were quite a few others as you will see in the Cinema Photos. The Vogue Cinema was situated were Langlands Road and Crossloan Road met. Its owner, George Singleton, ran an empire of seven cinemas, including the Vogue. Remember the ABC Minors at the Plaza on Saturdays? The Plaza was built on the site of the former Govan Cinema, the Plaza was designed by Charles McNair for Associated British Cinemas and opened in 1936. It was said that the glossy, comfortable interior of the Plaza reflected the luxury liners being built on the Clyde at the time.

HILLS TRUST PRIMARY SCHOOL
HILLS TRUST PRIMARY SCHOOL

Abraham Hill was a Govan-born merchant who made his fortune in Wolverhampton. In 1757 he bequeathed 200 for the purchase of land around Govan parish. The land was let for agriculture and the funds used to support the headmaster at Govan Parish School and pay the school fees of up to ten children: the number was increased to seventy in 1872, as the rising price of land in the area resulted in a vast increase in the amount of money at the disposal of the Trust.

THE ELDER PARK

In 1883 Isabella, the widow of John Elder of the Fairfield Shipyard, set aside 37 acres of land on the old Fairfield Farm off Renfrew Road as a public park.

The Elder Park was laid out by John Honeyman and opened by Lord Rosebery on 27 June 1885. In accordance with Mrs Elder's wishes, the park was intended solely for “healthful recreation by music and amusements,” and no ball games were to be permitted there.

THE ELDER PARK
1st CLYDE TUNNEL
1st CLYDE TUNNEL ROTUNDA GOVAN

THE FORGOTTEN TUNNEL: In the year 1895 Glasgow was in the grip of a kind of tunneling mania.

The Central Station low-level line was being dug, the underground railway circuit was nearing completion, and the Glasgow Harbour Tunnel Company's pride and joy was about to be opened after five years of excavating under the Clyde.

THE CLYDE TUNNEL ENTRANCE

The Clyde Tunnel is the length of seven football pitches. It cost 10.5m to build.  Work started in July 1957.  The construction involved a tunnel shield invented 139 years earlier by Marc Brunel. The first tunnel opened in July 1963, the second in March 1964. The tunnel is used by 65,000 vehicles every day It is 21ft below the surface of the river Clyde.
Work on the project started in 1957 and the first of the two parallel tunnel “bores” between Whiteinch and Govan was opened by the Queen on July 3, 1963. The second followed in March the following year. The tunnel is the length of seven football pitches and sits 21ft below the River Clyde.

PADDLE STEAMER WAVERLEY BUILT 1946

PS Waverley is the last seagoing passenger-carrying paddle steamer in the world. Built in 1946, she sailed from Craigendoran on the Firth of Clyde to Arrochar on Loch Long until 1973. Bought by the Paddle Steamer Preservation Society (PSPS), she has been restored to her 1947 appearance and now operates passenger excursions around the British coast.

She is named after Sir Walter Scott's first novel and was built in 1946 to replace a PS Waverley that was built in 1899. That Waverley served in the Second World War as a minesweeper but was sunk in 1940 while helping to evacuate troops from Dunkirk.

PADDLE STEAMER WAVERLEY BUILT 1946
FAIRFIELDS SHIPYARD

The Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company, Limited was a British shipbuilding company in the Govan area on the Clyde in Glasgow.

 Fairfields, as it is often known, was a major warship builder, turning out many vessels for the Royal Navy and other navies through the First World War and the Second World War.

It also built many transatlantic liners, including record breaking ships for Cunard and the Canadian Pacific.

FAIRFIELDS MAIN GATE
THE LYCEUM CAFE
THE LYCEM CAFE

The Lyceum cafe was a great cafe, and had the authentic 1960's interior, even the jukebox !!

It was run by the Angelini family in 1960, and by the same people, mainly philiana, right up to summer 2007.

It is still owned by the angelini's, but now operates as a beauty salon.

GOVAN OLD PARISH CHURCH
GOVAN OLD PARISH CHURCH

Govan Old Church is the oldest place of worship in Glasgow , located in the historic community of Govan – believed to have been the administrative and ecclesiastical centre of the ancient kingdom of Strathclyde.

Govan, originally an agricultural and fishing village, grew during the industrial revolution, through the development first of weaving then light engineering, to become, in the early 20th century, a world leader in the ship-building industry.

Following the economic depression, and the decline of Scotland ’s heavy industry, the face of Govan has changed significantly. In 1912, then an independent burgh with a population of around 100,000, Govan became part of the city of Glasgow .

There are signs currently, that with major public investment and the involvement of a range of statutory bodies, public agencies and voluntary organisations, issues of physical and social deprivation are being addressed, and there is a real prospect of effective regeneration.

RANGERS &  CELTIC
RANGERS &  CELTIC

Glasgow Rangers Football Club was formed by Peter Campbell, William McBeath and brothers, Peter and Moses McNeil. The team had no strips, money or even a football. They had their first match on Flesher's Haugh at Glasgow Green. It was against Callander Football Club and the final score was 0-0. They became established in 1873.

Celtic Football Club was formed in 1888 by Brother Walfrid Kerins, leader of the Marist Order. He had seen the benefits that Hibernian Football Club had given to Edinburgh and thought that a similar idea would work in the east end of Glasgow.

GLASGOW's COAT OF ARMS
GLASGOW's COAT OF ARMS

The tree denotes the frozen branch with which, by blowing into a flame, Saint Mungo re-kindled the monastery fire at Culross.

The bird is the robin he brought back to life after it had been decapitated.

The fish and ring are emblematic of a miracle, by which he restored to Langueth, the wife of King Ridderch of Strathclyde, a love token she had lost.

The bell represents that which he brought from Rome.

He died about 601, and for than five centuries after that date Glasgow has no authentic records.

Govan; (Scottish Gaelic: Baile a' Ghobhainn) is a district and former burgh now part of southwest City of Glasgow, Scotland. It is situated 2.5 miles (4.0 km) west of Glasgow city centre, on the south bank of the River Clyde, opposite the mouth of the River Kelvin and the district of Partick. According to medieval legend, Constantine, a 7th-century King of Strathclyde, founded a monastery under the rule of Columbanus in Govan.
During the Middle Ages, Govan was the site of a ferry which linked the area with Partick for seasonal cattle drovers. In the 18th and 19th centuries, textile mills and coal mining were important; in the early 19th century shipbuilding emerged as Govan's principal industry. In 1864, Govan gained burgh status, and was Scotland's fifth largest burgh. It was incorporated into the city of Glasgow in 1912. However, the people of Govan often proclaim to be Govanites first and Glaswegians second and when asked "are you from Glesga?", still reply with "naw, Acumfaegovan" (No, I come from Govan).

GOVAN BURGH ARMS
NAW, ACUMFAGOVAN

Hey Jimmy, are you from Glasgow?

GOVAN BURGH ARMS
2nd CLYDE TUNNEL GOVAN
Clyde-Alexander-Stephen-Sons-Linthouse

Alexander Stephen and Sons was a Private type yard in the Industry was Shipbuilding & Engineering. It was Founded in 1750 and Defunct and closed in 1982 the Headquarters was in Linthouse, just along Govan Road.  Alexander Stephen and Sons Limited, referred to simply as Alex Stephens or just Stephens, was a Scottish shipbuilding company based in Linthouse, Glasgow, on the River Clyde.

Alexander Stephen and Sons Limitedtext
MyGOVAN
MyGOVAN 2016
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